A look at the blind Kumamoto experiment: combining active and passive seismic observations to avoid Rayleigh-wave mode misidentification - Université Côte d'Azur Access content directly
Journal Articles Earth Planets and Space Year : 2023

A look at the blind Kumamoto experiment: combining active and passive seismic observations to avoid Rayleigh-wave mode misidentification

Abstract

Abstract We present our pathway through participation in the blind Kumamoto exercise, particularly the Step 1 of site characterization. The combination of passive and active seismic imaging techniques is used to image the velocity profile beneath the KUMA site. The estimation of the broadband Rayleigh wave dispersion curve is based on cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise and analysis of active seismic shots. We calculate correlations from the entire time series (only vertical components) of each seismic array after classical pre-processing of ambient noise data. Then, a passive seismic section is constructed using all available stations pairs and stacking the cross-correlation traces with similar interstation distances. The obtained passive seismic section is analyzed using a high-resolution Radon transform to obtain the dispersion image of Rayleigh waves traveling through the KUM-LL, KUM-M and KUM-SM arrays. Then, the information is merged and interpolated to obtain the final broadband dispersion curve. In addition, active source seismic data are used with the high-resolution Radon technique to constrain the model at shallow depths (< 30 m). Then, a broadband dispersion image is constructed with significant energy from 0.9 Hz to 45 Hz. The final dispersion curve is inverted using the non-linear neighborhood algorithm. Using just the fundamental mode Rayleigh wave, a first model with normal velocity variation in depth is obtained that corresponds well with the preferred model provided by the organizing committee. The addition of a mHVSR curve in a joint inversion better constrains the deeper part of the model (> 1 km). After comparison of the submitted dispersion curve to the theoretical dispersion curve for the preferred model (Step 4 of the blind test), the authors note that there was a clear misinterpretation in the fundamental mode of their submitted results, especially at frequencies higher than 5 Hz. Using both fundamental (only visible in the passive data set) and first overtones of Rayleigh waves (only visible in the active seismic data set) a refined velocity model could have been inferred, but we decided to keep our first submitted result. This detailed interpretation should be further studied as dispersion images from forward and backward hammer shots are quite different, which may indicate strong variations in the geometry and/or shear-wave velocities of the first meters of the subsurface. Graphical Abstract

Domains

Earth Sciences
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Dates and versions

hal-04138317 , version 1 (22-06-2023)

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E. Diego Mercerat, T. Dylan Mikesell. A look at the blind Kumamoto experiment: combining active and passive seismic observations to avoid Rayleigh-wave mode misidentification. Earth Planets and Space, 2023, 75 (1), pp.31. ⟨10.1186/s40623-023-01785-9⟩. ⟨hal-04138317⟩
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